5 Vision Myth Busters

Raise your Eye-Q with some optic truth


little girl holding up carrots

By: Heather Creekmore

Do carrots really help you see better? Can sitting too close to the television really ruin your vision? Here’s the real deal, from our friends at Prevent Blindness Georgia.

Myth #1: Reading in Dim Light Will Ruin Your Eyes

The truth is that reading in dim light will make your eyes feel tired, which is called eye strain. Dim light alone won’t cause actual eye damage.

Myth #2: Eating More Carrots Will Help Improve Your Vision

Carrots are good for your eyes because they are filled with Vitamin A. This is why you’ve never seen a rabbit wearing glasses! Only a small amount of this vitamin is actually necessary for good eye health, so there’s no need to overdo it on carrot consumption.

Myth #3: Sitting Too Close to the TV Will Hurt Your Eyes

While there is an optimal distance you should keep away from the screen, sitting too close won’t cause you to become nearsighted. Often children sit too close to the television to help them focus, but if they continue to sit close as they age, it may be a sign of nearsightedness and an indication that vision correction is needed.

Myth #4: There’s Nothing You Can Do to Prevent Sight Loss

This is absolutely false! Most people that lose their sight in accidents do so because they weren’t wearing proper safety glasses. Getting regular eye examinations will also help guard against eye disease and preserve your vision in the long run.

Myth #5: You Only Need an Eye Exam if you’re Having Problems

Getting your eyes examined every year if you are as healthy adult between ages 18-60, or more often if you eye issues or are 61 or older, is one of the wisest things you can do to preserve your vision. It can also be one of the best things you can do for your overall health as well. More studies are showing that your eyes can provide a window into the health of your whole body. The health of the blood vessels in your retina can be an indicator of the health of your other blood vessels. Diseases like diabetes or conditions like high blood pressure can also sometimes be detected through your routine eye exam.